Glenariff Forest Park

Glenariff, the Queen of the Glens, is one of the nine Antrim Glens. Glenariff Forest Park covers over 1,000 hectares with planted woodland, lakes, outdoor recreation spaces and conservation areas.


Tree disease

There is currently an outbreak of the Japanese larch tree disease (P. ramorum) in Glenariff. Timber harvesting will be ongoing. During this work, there are some restrictions on public access to the forest park and forest paths, including closure of part of the Scenic Trail.

Visitors should pay attention to health and safety signs and other signage providing information on biosecurity measures which are needed to help prevent the spread of this disease.

For more information on preventing the spread of tree disease, visit the following page:


Glenariff Forest Park caters for many outdoor activities including walking, caravanning and camping, and horse riding. It has picnic and barbeque areas as well as a tea house. Special events can be arranged by permit. Guided walks are also available on application.

Caravan site

Glenariff Forest Park caravan site will be open from Friday 1 July 2016 until Sunday 4 September 2016.

Bookings for the site (maximum stay 14 nights) must be arranged and paid for in advance by contacting Forest Service at Garvagh Forest Office – 028 7034 0848 or 7034 0849  (booking hours Monday – Friday from 9.00 a.m. to 4.00 p.m. only)

The nightly rate is £20 per caravan inclusive of electricity.

Please note that accommodation is provided for caravans and camper vans only, there are no facilities for tents.


For admission charges, visit the following page:

Trails at Glenariff Forest Park

Glenariff Forest is home to many animals of conservation concern, most notably the red squirrel, hen harrier and Irish hare. There are several walking trails through the forest which give spectacular views and glimpses of wildlife.

Viewpoint trail (just over half a mile)

From the viewpoint on the trail you can look down the Glen to the sea in the distance. The walk then takes you past the café and and back to the car park via the ornamental gardens.

Waterfall walk trail (almost two miles)

This path features the waterfalls and National Nature Reserve. There are stairways, pathways cut into the near vertical sides of the gorge and boardwalks on stilts in the river. It is a spectacular walk.

The Waterfall trail is open for visitors on foot, however, public access through the Forest Park by the main entrance may occasionally be restricted because of construction work.

Scenic trail (partially closed due to tree felling works)

The trail takes you down the Inver River gorge, nearly to the Ess-na-CrubWaterfall. Once you cross the river, you begin a long and winding climb from about 60 metres elevation to 260 metres over about 1.1km. Once you have done this climb there are good views over the Glen and across the sea as far as the Mull of Kintyre.

Rainbow trail (500 yards)

This is an optional detour on theWaterfall walk. It includes crossing the Rainbow Bridge.

Glenariff National Nature Reserve

The rocky gorges of the river support a wide range of mosses, liverworts and ferns. Due to the richness and diversity of these plants, part of the Glenariff Glen has been designated as a National Nature Reserve. The timber walkway that winds through the glen and alongside the river gorge was first built about 100 years ago and has been carefully reconstructed to provide a spectacular walk.

How to get there

You can enter the forest from the A43 Glenariff Road. 

The Waterfall trail is open for visitors on foot, however, public access through the Forest Park by the main entrance may occasionally be restricted because of construction work.

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