New State Pension deferral

You can choose when you want to start claiming new State Pension. Your State Pension age is the earliest you can start getting State Pension, but it does not mean you have to give up work. You must normally live in Northern Ireland or the UK to defer claiming State Pension.

This information is for a man born on or after 6 April 1951 or a woman born on or after 6 April 1953

Reaching State Pension age on or after 6 April 2016

You don’t have to claim new State Pension when you reach State Pension age. If you defer claiming you may get extra money when you do claim it. The extra money is paid with your new State Pension and may be taxable.

There are different rules for deferring your State Pension if you’re:

  • a man born on or after 6 April 1951
  • a woman born on or after 6 April 1953

You’ll need to defer it for at least nine weeks and your State Pension will increase by 1% for every nine weeks you put off claiming.  This works out at just under 5.8% for every full year you put off claiming.

The extra amount will usually increase each year. The extra amount is paid with your State Pension and may be taxable.

Deferring your claim to get extra new State Pension

If you defer for the minimum amount of time or longer, you could get extra new State Pension when you do claim it.

From 6 April 2016, you won't be able to claim a lump sum payment unless you reached State Pension age before 6 April 2016 and deferred your claim.

Deferral if you get benefits

If you receive unemployment benefit or certain other benefits before you reach State Pension age, your new State Pension will be paid to you automatically when you reach State Pension age.

If you want to defer, you'll need to tell the Northern Ireland Pension Centre.

Extra new State Pension if you're claiming other entitlements

If you’re getting means tested benefits, extra State Pension you receive from deferring will count as income and will affect these benefits:

  • Pension Credit
  • Housing Benefit
  • Rate Relief
  • Tax Credits

If you’re deferring your State Pension, you won’t build up any extra State Pension for the days you’re also receiving any of the following benefits:

  • Income Support
  • Pension Credit
  • Employment and Support Allowance (income-related)
  • Jobseeker’s Allowance (income-based)
  • Universal Credit
  • Carer’s Allowance
  • Incapacity Benefit
  • Severe Disablement Allowance
  • Widow’s Pension
  • Bereavement Allowance
  • Widowed Mother’s Allowance
  • Widowed Parent’s Allowance
  • Unemployability Supplement
  • any type of State Pension

If you’re deferring your State Pension, you won’t build up any extra State Pension for the days your partner is getting any of the following benefits:

  • Income Support
  • Pension Credit
  • Employment Support Allowance (income-related)
  • Jobseeker’s Allowance (income-based)
  • Universal Credit

If you get Graduated Retirement Benefit or Shared Additional Pension, these days will count towards your extra State Pension.

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