Obesity

The term ’obese’ describes a person who's very overweight, with a lot of body fat. Being overweight or obese can lead to problems that can seriously affect your health. You can reduce your risk of being overweight by eating a healthier diet and being more physically active.

 About obesity

Obesity is an increasingly common problem in Northern Ireland. It is estimated to affect around one in every four adults and around one in every five children aged 2 to 15 years.

There are many ways in which a person's health in relation to their weight can be classified. But the most widely used method is body mass index (BMI).

BMI is a measure of whether you're a healthy weight for your height. You can use the BMI healthy weight calculator to work out your score.

For most adults, a BMI of:

  • 18.5 to 24.9 means you're a healthy weight
  • 25 to 29.9 means you're overweight
  • 30 to 39.9 means you're obese
  • 40 or above means you're severely obese

BMI isn't used to definitively diagnose obesity. This is because people who are very muscular sometimes have a high BMI without excess fat. But for most people, BMI is a useful indication of whether they're a healthy weight, overweight or obese.

A better measure of excess fat is waist circumference, which can be used as an additional measure in people who are overweight (with a BMI of 25 to 29.9) or moderately obese (with a BMI of 30 to 34.9).

Generally, men with a waist circumference of 94cm (37in) or more and women with a waist circumference of 80cm (about 31.5in) or more are more likely to develop obesity-related health problems.

Risks of obesity

It's very important to take steps to tackle obesity. This is because, as well as causing obvious physical changes, it can lead to a number of serious and potentially life-threatening conditions, such as:

Obesity can also affect your quality of life and lead to psychological problems, such as depression and low self-esteem (see below for more information about the health problems associated with obesity).

Causes of obesity

Obesity is generally caused by consuming more calories – particularly those in fatty and sugary foods – than you burn off through physical activity. The excess energy is stored by the body as fat.

Obesity is an increasingly common problem. This is because for many people modern living involves eating excessive amounts of cheap, high-calorie food and spending a lot of time sitting down, at desks, on sofas or in cars.

There are also some underlying health conditions that can occasionally contribute to weight gain, such as an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism). Although these type of conditions don’t usually cause weight problems if they're effectively controlled with medication.

Treating obesity

The best way to treat obesity is to eat healthier and to be more physically active.  To do this you should:

  • eat a balanced, calorie-controlled diet as recommended by your GP or weight loss management health professional (such as a dietitian)
  • take up activities such as fast walking, jogging, swimming or tennis for 150 to 300 minutes (two-and-a-half to five hours) a week
  • eat slowly and avoid situations where you know you could be tempted to overeat

Some people find it helpful to join a local weight loss group.

You should check with your doctor if you:

  • haven’t done any activity for a long time
  • are living with a health condition or disability

 They’ll be able to advise you on the best way to approach increasing your level of physical activity.

You may also benefit from receiving psychological support from a trained healthcare professional to help change the way you think about food and eating.

If lifestyle changes alone don't help you lose weight, medication may be recommended. Your GP will discuss the most appropriate treatment for you.

In rare cases, weight loss surgery may be recommended.

Other obesity-related problems

Obesity can cause a number of further problems, including difficulties with daily activities and serious health conditions.

Day-to-day problems related to obesity include:

  • breathlessness
  • increased sweating
  • snoring
  • difficulty doing physical activity
  • often feeling very tired
  • joint and back pain
  • low confidence and self-esteem
  • feeling isolated

The psychological problems associated with being obese can also affect your relationships with family and friends and may lead to depression.

Serious health conditions

Being obese can also increase your risk of developing many potentially serious health conditions, including:

 

The information on this page has been adapted from original content from the NHS website.

For further information see terms and conditions.

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