Atherosclerosis (arteriosclerosis)

Atherosclerosis can potentially cause serious problems. It causes arteries to become clogged with fatty substances called plaques, or atheroma. It’s reduced by having a healthy lifestyle. Treatment can help reduce the risk of serious problems. See your GP if you're worried you may have a high risk for atherosclerosis.

About atherosclerosis

When arteries become clogged with plaques, these plaques cause the arteries to harden and narrow. This cuts down the blood flow and oxygen supply to vital organs, and increases the risk of blood clots that could potentially block the flow of blood to the heart or brain.

Atherosclerosis doesn't tend to have any symptoms at first. Many people may be unaware they have it. But it can eventually cause life-threatening problems such as heart attacks and strokes if it gets worse.

The condition is largely preventable with a healthy lifestyle, and treatment can help reduce the risk of serious problems occurring.

Health risks of atherosclerosis

If left to get worse, atherosclerosis can potentially lead to a number of serious conditions which together are known as cardiovascular disease (CVD). There won't usually be any symptoms until CVD develops.

Types of CVD include:

  • coronary heart disease – the main arteries that supply your heart (the coronary arteries) become clogged with plaques which leads to either:
    • angina – if the arteries are only narrowed you can have short periods of tight, dull or heavy chest pain which last a short while: as the narrowing increases the pain can become worse or occur more often and can lead to a heart attack
    • heart attacks – where the blood supply to your heart is blocked completely, causing sudden crushing or indigestion-like chest pain that can spread to nearby areas, as well as shortness of breath and dizziness
  • strokes – where the blood supply to your brain is interrupted, causing the face to droop to one side, weakness on one side of the body, and slurred speech
  • transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs) – where there are temporary symptoms of a stroke
  • peripheral arterial disease – where the blood supply to your legs is blocked, causing leg pain when walking

Who's at risk of atherosclerosis

Exactly why and how arteries become clogged is unclear.

It can happen to anyone, although the following things can increase your risk:

You can't do anything about some of these factors. But by tackling things such as an unhealthy diet and a lack of exercise, you can help reduce your risk of atherosclerosis and CVD.

Testing for atherosclerosis

Speak to your GP if you're worried you may be at a high risk of atherosclerosis.

If you're over the age of 40, you should see your GP. They will let you know if you should have a check to find out if you're at risk of atherosclerosis and CVD).

Your GP or practice nurse can work out your level of risk by taking into account things such as:

  • your age, gender and ethnic group
  • your weight and height
  • if you smoke or have previously smoked
  • if you have a family history of CVD
  • your blood pressure and cholesterol levels
  • if you have certain long-term conditions

Depending on your result, you may be advised to make lifestyle changes, consider taking medication, or have further tests to check for atherosclerosis and CVD.

Reduce your risk of atherosclerosis

Making healthy lifestyle changes can reduce your risk of developing atherosclerosis and may help stop it getting worse.

The main ways you can reduce your risk are:

  • stop smoking –ask your GP about stop smoking treatments; read more advice about stopping smoking 
  • have a healthy diet – avoid foods that are high in saturated fats, salt or sugar, and aim to eat five portions of fruit and vegetables a day;
  • exercise regularly – aim for at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity such as cycling or fast walking every week, and strength exercises on at least two days a week
  • maintain a healthy weight – aim for a body mass index (BMI) of 18.5 to 24.9; use the BMI calculator to work out your BMI and read advice about losing weight
  • reduce how much alcohol you drink  – men and women are advised not to regularly drink more than 14 alcohol units a week;

Treatments for atherosclerosis

There aren't currently any treatments that can reverse atherosclerosis, but the healthy lifestyle changes suggested above may help stop it getting worse.

Sometimes additional treatment to reduce the risk of problems like heart attacks and strokes may also be recommended, such as:

The information on this page has been adapted from original content from the NHS website.

For further information see terms and conditions.

This page was published December 2018

This page is due for review December 2019

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