Liver cancer

Cancer that begins in the liver is an uncommon, but serious type of cancer. This is different from liver cancer that spreads to the liver after developing elsewhere in the body (not covered on this page). See your GP if you notice any of the symptoms below.

Symptoms of liver cancer

Symptoms of liver cancer are often vague and don't appear until the cancer is at an advanced stage. They can include:

When to see your GP

See your GP if you notice any of the symptoms listed above. They're more likely to be the result of a more common condition, such as an infection, but it's best to have them checked.

You should also contact your GP if you've previously been diagnosed with a condition known to affect the liver, such as cirrhosis or a hepatitis C infection, and your health suddenly deteriorates.

Liver cancer is usually diagnosed after a consultation with a GP and a referral to a hospital specialist for further tests, such as scans of your liver.

Regular check-ups for liver cancer are often recommended for people known to have a high risk of developing the condition, such as those with cirrhosis.

Having regular check-ups helps make sure the condition is diagnosed early. The earlier liver cancer is diagnosed, the more effective treatment is likely to be.

Causes of liver cancer

The exact cause of liver cancer is unknown. Most cases are associated with damage and scarring of the liver known as cirrhosis.

Cirrhosis can have a number of different causes, including:

It's also believed obesity and an unhealthy diet can increase the risk of liver cancer because this can lead to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

You may be able to significantly reduce your chances of developing liver cancer by:

Although liver cancer is uncommon in Northern Ireland, the chances of developing the condition are high for people with risk factors for the condition.

Over the past few decades, rates of liver cancer in Northern Ireland have been rising, possibly as a result of increased levels of alcohol intake and obesity.

Treatment for liver cancer

If you are diagnosed with a liver cancer, your hospital consultant will discuss treatment options with you.

Treatment depends on the stage the condition is at. If diagnosed early, it may be possible to remove the cancer completely.

Treatment options in the early stages of liver cancer include:

  • surgical resection – surgery to remove a section of liver
  • liver transplant – where the liver is replaced with a donor liver
  • microwave or radiofrequency ablation – where microwaves or radio waves are used to destroy the cancerous cells

Only a small number of liver cancers are diagnosed at a stage where these treatments are suitable. Most people are diagnosed when the cancer has spread too far to be removed or completely destroyed.

In these cases, treatments such as chemotherapy are used to slow down the spread of the cancer and relieve symptoms such as pain and discomfort.

The information on this page has been adapted from original content from the NHS website.

For further information see terms and conditions.

This page was published May 2018

This page is due for review January 2020

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