New State Pension explained

State Pension is a regular payment people can claim when they reach State Pension age. The New State Pension was introduced on 6 April 2016. You can still receive new State Pension if you have other income like a personal or workplace pension.

This information is for a man born on or after 6 April 1951 or a woman born on or after 6 April 1953

State Pension age before 6 April 2016

If you reached State Pension age before 6 April 2016, you will claim under the previous State Pension scheme. You can find out more about at the link below.

State Pension as part of your retirement plan

When you get your State Pension, you will have a regular income for the rest of your life. It can give you a reliable source of income in retirement, although it might not be enough to support the lifestyle you want. You may decide you want to consider saving more money yourself or contributing to a private pension.

If you want to make a plan for your retirement, it's important to know the amount of State Pension that you are building up. A State Pension forecast may help. Find out how to get a State Pension forecast on the following nidirect page:

Who can get the new State Pension

People build up State Pension entitlement depending on their National Insurance record. Most people build up some State Pension, but the amount they get varies.

The new State Pension was introduced for anyone reaching State Pension age on or after 6 April 2016. You can still receive new State Pension if you have other income like a personal or workplace pension.

The earliest you can claim new State Pension is when you reach State Pension age. You will be eligible to claim new State Pension if you’re:

  • a man born on or after 6 April 1951
  • a woman born on or after 6 April 1953

Find out when you'll reach State Pension age

Check when you’ll reach State Pension age or Pension Credit qualifying age by using the online calculator:

Your National Insurance record

Your new State Pension is based on your National Insurance record. National Insurance contributions or credits on your National Insurance record before 6 April 2016 will count towards your new State Pension.

You will usually need at least 10 qualifying years on your National Insurance record to get any new State Pension. The qualifying years don’t need to be consecutive. This means for 10 years, one or more of the following applied to you:

  • you worked and paid National Insurance contributions
  • you received National Insurance credits due to unemployment, sickness or as a parent or carer
  • you paid voluntary National Insurance contributions

If you’ve lived or worked abroad you may still be able to get some new State Pension.

You may also qualify if you’ve paid married women’s or widow’s reduced rate contributions.

To find out more about qualifying for new State Pension, visit the following nidirect page:

How much you can get

The full amount of new State Pension is £164.35 a week.

Under the new system, from 6 April 2016, the actual amount will depend on your National Insurance record. You could receive a higher or lower amount.

Use the links below to find out how to check your national insurance record and to see examples of how the new State Pension is calculated.

For more information about qualifying for new State Pension and paying tax on State Pension, visit the following nidirect pages:

More useful links

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