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Tackling anti-social behaviour

Anti-social behaviour can have a negative effect on the quality of life of individuals and communities. It is therefore important to report your concerns about anti-social behaviour you are experiencing at an early stage.

What is anti-social behaviour?

The term anti-social behaviour (ASB) is used to describe a wide range of inconsiderate and nuisance behaviour, such as:

  • too much noise
  • graffiti
  • littering
  • disputes with neighbours

While this type of behaviour may not, in itself, be a criminal offence, it can have an effect on the quality of life of individuals and communities. It is therefore important to report your concerns about anti-social behaviour you are experiencing at an early stage, before a problem appears to be getting needlessly out of control.

Who can help?

Local councils, the Northern Ireland Housing Executive, Housing Associations, private landlords and police all have a role in tackling the range of behaviours which people often consider as anti-social. This can make it difficult to identify who you should contact for help.

Local councils

Local councils have responsibility for:

Northern Ireland Housing Executive

The Housing Executive has responsibility for:

  • noisy or disruptive tenants
  • neglected dwellings/ gardens
  • use of premises for illegal purposes
  • use of premises for business purposes
  • neighbourhood disputes

You can find contact details for the Housing Executive below:

Police Service of Northern Ireland

Some behaviours which people consider anti-social may involve criminal activity and, where this is the case, the police should be notified. They have responsibility for:

  • motoring offences
  • drunken and rowdy behaviour in a public place
  • criminal damage
  • assaults
  • theft
  • intimidation
  • harassment
  • drug use/ dealing
  • hate crime

You can contact the police using the following:

What you can do to help

When reporting anti-social behaviour, it is useful if you can provide as many details as possible. This will help decide the most suitable and proportionate action to deal with your case. These include:

  • as much information as possible about the incident (location, time, description of those involved, if this has happened before)
  • if you are worried about your own safety or your family’s safety
  • if you think the incident was aggravated by any other factors such as sectarian or racial abuse, any form of hostility such as homophobia or based on disability
  • details of any witnesses of the incident
  • the impact the incident has had on you
  • your contact details

Policing and Community Safety Partnerships

Policing and Community Safety Partnerships (PCSPs) also have a role in working with organisations and communities to address anti-social behaviour in your local area. To find out more about their work, contact your local PCSP.

  • Policing and Community Safety Partnerships

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